Deadliest Disease Epidemics

The Top 20 most deadliest Disease Epidemics

disease epidemics
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During history of mankind there were many horrible disease epidemics, killing millions of people.
The worst of them you can check in the Top 20 list of the most deadliest Disease Epidemics!

Polio epidemic
Photo Credit: Content Providers(s): CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy, Sylvia Whitfield, Polio EM PHIL 1875 lores, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

20. Polio (1916) USA – 6,000 deaths

Cholera epidemic
anonymous, Cholera bacteria SEM, marked as public domain

19. Cholera (since 2010) Haiti – 8,492 deaths

Since its reintroduction to Haiti in October 2010, cholera has spread across the country and has become endemic, causing high levels of both morbidity and mortality. Since its reintroduction to Haiti following the 2010 Haitian earthquake, nearly 800,000 Haitians have been infected by cholera

Cholera hamburg epidemic
Unknown, Cholerabaracke-HH-1892, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

18. Cholera (1892) Germany – 8,605 deaths

The 1892 cholera outbreak in Hamburg, Germany was a major European outbreak and about 8,605 people died in that city. Although many residents held the city government responsible for the virulence of the epidemic (leading to cholera riots in 1893), it continued with practices largely unchanged. This was the last serious European cholera outbreak of the century.

Typhus epidemic
Hopper, Typhus Art.IWMPST14200, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

17. Typhus (1899) South Africa – 9,000 deaths

Smallpox epidemic
Photo Credit: Content Providers(s): CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy; Sylvia Whitfield, Smallpox virus virions TEM PHIL 1849, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

16. Smallpox (1775-1778) North America – 11,000 deaths

Ebola virus epidemic
See Source, Ebola virions, CC BY 2.5

15. Ebola (2013-2016) Westafrica – 11,316 deaths

The Western African Ebola virus epidemic was the most widespread outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history—causing major loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in the region, mainly in the countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The first cases were recorded in Guinea in December 2013; later, the disease spread to neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone, with minor outbreaks occurring elsewhere.

Smallpox virus epidemic
Photo Credit: Content Providers(s): CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy; Sylvia Whitfield, Smallpox virus virions TEM PHIL 1849, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

14. Smallpox (1862) North America – 14,000 deaths

Swine flu H1N1 virus epidemic
Manu5, H1N1 virus, CC BY-SA 4.0

13. Swine flu (2009-2010) worldwide – 18,449 deaths

The 2009 flu pandemic or swine flu was an influenza pandemic that lasted from early 2009 to late 2010, and the second of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza virus (the first of them being the 1918 flu pandemic), albeit in a new version. First described in April 2009, the virus appeared to be a new strain of H1N1 which resulted when a previous triple reassortment of bird, swine and human flu viruses further combined with a Eurasian pig flu virus, leading to the term “swine flu”.

Typhus warning
Unknown or not provided, TYPHUS IS SPREAD BY LICE – NARA – 515891, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

12. Typhus (1812) Europe – 15,000-17,000 deaths

During Napoleon’s retreat from Moscow in 1812, more French soldiers died of typhus than were killed by the Russians.

Great Plague 1665 1666 england london epidemic
unknwn, Great plague of london-1665, marked as public domain, more details on Wikimedia Commons

11. Great Plague (1665/1666) England – 100,000 deaths

The Great Plague, lasting from 1665 to 1666, was the last major epidemic of the bubonic plague to occur in England. It happened within the centuries-long time period of the Second Pandemic, an extended period of intermittent bubonic plague epidemics which originated in China in 1331, the first year of the Black Death, an outbreak which included other forms such as pneumonic plague, and lasted until 1750.